GTRI 2014: Day 10, Muhanga


July 10, 2014. Centre St. Andre

Thursday, Day 2 of the Community of Practice with the Bible Society of Rwanda. Already we are seeing deepening relationships. Last night many Americans and Rwandans sat together in the dining area talking and getting to know each other and revealing deep stories, stories of courage, pain, and hope. Precious times.

On day two of the Community of Practice we began with a short devotional considering Jeremiah’s lament. Barbara Shaffer and Carol King led a training and discussion of the problem of domestic violence. This is a new chapter in the Healing Wounds of Trauma materials. We discussed how much of a problem it is in Rwanda, why women stay, and how we can help both victim and abuser.

DSC_0307In the afternoon, we did another teaching (Carol and myself) regarding the problem of suicide. It appears that most Rwandans believe that one who commits suicide is automatically going to hell. In addition, the family is often shunned. This seemed a very entrenched belief and so my raising doubts and questions resulted in very spirited debate. While we also discussed how to help the suicidal person and how to help the family members, I left them with the encouragement not to speak for God and since no verses speak to the future of suicide persons, they ought to be careful to put words into God’s mouth.

We ended this conference day by giving the Rwandans an opportunity to have a session for their own care. We can see the weariness on their faces. Baraka led a care for the caregiver session while the GTRI team met to process what we were hearing and seeing–the heartache and the resiliency.

Monique (R) with Souvenir

Monique (R) with Souvenir

We had the privilege of listening to Monique’s story of surviving the genocide as a teenager and God’s subsequent call on her life. The story is too precious and hard to share here beyond a few words. She survived when family members around her were executed (shot) and fell on top of her. The killers left the pile of bodies, not knowing that she was not killed. Just prior to this event, she had read Psalm 91 and heard God speaking to her about her own future when she read verse 7,

“A thousand may fall at your side, ten thousand at your right hand, but it will not come near you.” 

She has gone one to become an evangelist for Christ and a helper of the hurting. I can attest that she has a gift that few have. And I will never read that verse again in the same way

As the previous night, many of us stayed up quite late deepening relationships with new and old Rwandan friends. Looking over the dinner area, I saw heads bowed in prayer, attempts to speak in French, cackling laughter, and the sharing of food and drink. Such a beautiful sight.

Tomorrow will end our COP and we will move on south to Butare.

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Filed under Africa, counseling skills, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

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