DR Congo’s Withcraft Epidemic: 50,000 Children Accused of Sorcery – IBTimes UK


When we hear about abuse within churches these days we often think about sexual abuse by leaders. But there are other forms of abuse that happen in other parts of the world. The following link talks about abuse that happens as a child is accused of being a witch or engaging the demonic world. In our Global Trauma Recovery course, we looked at some of the ways adult women in Ghana are accused of sorcery and who must then flee to witch camps to save their lives. The link below addresses the abuse of children labeled demonic in the DRC.

When you finish reading, you might sigh with relief that this isn’t a problem in the US church. Well, maybe not so fast? If you check out the lawsuit against Sovereign Grace Ministries, there are equally distressing accounts of abuse and cover-up.

DR Congo’s Withcraft Epidemic: 50,000 Children Accused of Sorcery – IBTimes UK.

2 Comments

Filed under Abuse, church and culture, counseling, Doctrine/Theology, DRC, stories, suffering, trauma

2 responses to “DR Congo’s Withcraft Epidemic: 50,000 Children Accused of Sorcery – IBTimes UK

  1. Tom

    Tip of the iceberg. For a fuller treatment, read Adam Ashforth’s “Witchcraft, Violence, and Democracy in South Africa.” I’m not sure where the Sovereign Grace scandal fits here except to note that abuse is abuse. Examples of western “witch” type allegations are the Salem witch trials, the House UnAmerican Activities Committee, and, of course, the whole Satanic Ritual Abuse/Recovered Memory movements. It’s interesting how much the Bible has to say about false accusations; way more than sexual abuse – which isn’t to minimize either…

  2. Joseph Owuoth

    Dear Phil,   Iam  a Kenya Army officer, a counseloor and a practising catholic. I have been following your musings for several years and is particularly touching as I was in Eastern Congo for over a year as a UN military observer.   I intend to start a blog which with your permisiion I intend to name it ” Musings of a Kenyan counsellor” I should borrow heavily from your work and even have links to your many connections.   Do kindly comment.   Regards

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